Plaque

This section is designed to provide you with some useful general information concerning your dental health. Dentistry is ever evolving. Advancements in dental researches continue to influence our treatment approaches and understanding of oral diseases: its causes, manifestations and treatment options. Please check back with us from time to time for recent articles on new studies and findings. The articles presented here are mere information to educate our patients. They are not a substitute to a clinical exam and consultation with a licensed dental practitioner. Please call our office at 908-689-5129 to schedule a visit with one of our dentists for more information on any particular dental concern. All articles are courtesy of the American Dental Association's Council on Dental Practice's Marketing Handbook Series.

Plaque is a film of bacteria that forms on your teeth and gums after eating foods that produce acids. These foods may include carbohydrates (starches and sugars), such as candy and cookies, and starchy foods such as bread, crackers, and cereal.

Tooth decay, commonly known as cavities, occurs when plaque remains on your teeth for an extended period of time, allowing the bacteria to ‘eat away’ at the surfaces of your teeth and gums.  Ironically, the areas surrounding restored portions of teeth (where fillings, or amalgams have been placed) are particularly vulnerable to decay and are a breeding ground for bacteria.

Plaque can lead to gum irritation, soreness, and redness. Sometimes, your gums may begin to bleed as a result of plaque. This gradual degeneration can often cause gums to pull away from teeth. This condition is called receding gums.

Long-term plaque can lead to serious problems. Sometimes, the bacteria can form pockets of disease around tooth structures, eventually destroying the bone beneath the tooth.